Category: Theology

Theology filtered by type: Journal Articles

Carol LaHurd "Two Popes, Two Churches: One Augsburg, One Gospel" Fall In Dialog: A Journal of Theology. vol. 44, no. 3, 2005 : 296-302

Referring to her own experience teaching in Roman Catholic universities and with ecumenical relations and dialogue, LaHurd examines the significance for Lutherans of the papacy of John Paul II and Cardinal Ratzinger’s 2005 election as Pope Benedict XVI. Also considered are magisterial theology and the 1999 Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification.

Carol LaHurd "One God, One Father: Abraham in Judaism, Christianity and Islam" Winter In Dialog: A Journal of Theology. vol. 29, 1990 : 17-24

The essay compares and contrasts the stories and significance of the Abraham figure in the scripture and traditions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and proposes how Abraham can be both a divisive and unifying factor for contemporary dialogue and relations.

Carol LaHurd "Striving Toward the Garden: The Concept of Peace in Islam" fall In The Journal of World Peace. vol. VII, 1990 : 11-16

In contrast to popular misunderstandings of Islamic principles of warfare and of the concept of jihad, the article examines the layers of meaning of “peace” in Islam and the classical rules for external warfare in Islamic scripture and tradition.

Carol LaHurd "Reading Each Others’ Scriptures" Winter In Dialog: A Journal of Theology. vol. 34, 1995 : 56-59

In the process of reviewing Jon D. Levenson’s 1993 The Death and Resurrection of the Beloved Son, LaHurd raises questions about the lenses through which Jewish and Christians scholars interpret each other’s biblical texts.

Carol LaHurd "Public and Private Realities: Women, Youth and Family Tradition" Spring In Word & World. vol. 16, no. 2, 1996 : 143-150

Reflecting on her own encounters with Arab Muslim women, LaHurd describes theoretical principles and present day diverse realities to illuminate some modern issues for Muslim women, youth, and families.

Carol LaHurd "So that the Sinner Will Repent: Forgiveness in Islam and Christianity" Fall In Dialog: A Journal of Theology. vol. 35, no. 4, 1996 : 287-292

In light of scriptural and theological traditions, LaHurd compares the concepts of repentance and forgiveness in Islam and Christianity, as well views of human sin and God’s response in each.

Carol LaHurd "Clash or Cooperation? Prospects for Muslim-Christian Relations in the United States" Fall In Listening: Journal of Religion and Culture. ed. LaHurd, Carol. vol. 31, no. 3, 1996 : 219-235

Guest editor for theme issue and author of article. LaHurd summarizes the global history of Muslim-Christian interaction, explores issues that can help or hinder future relations and cooperation among Muslims and Christians in the United States, and provides an appendix of resources for guiding such encounters.

Carol LaHurd "The ‘Other’ in Biblical Perspective" In Currents in Theology and Mission. vol. 24, no. 5, October 1997 : 411-424

Examining such texts as Jesus and the Samaritan woman in John 4, this essay surveys biblical treatments of the ethnic and religious “other” to provide resources for a current day hermeneutics of dialogue.

Carol LaHurd "The Disarming Word: Reading Scripture in the Boundary Zones" Spring-Summer In Journal of Ecumenical Studies. vol. 38, no. 2-3, 2001 : 271-285

In the face of ongoing ethnic and political conflicts worldwide, reading and discussion of scripture across religious boundaries is one strategy for defusing antagonisms. Drawing upon the author’s experience with both biblical interpretation and dialogue among Jews, Christians, and Muslims, this essay describes potential benefits and hazards of such interfaith reading and provides practical suggestions for initiating this form of dialogue encounter.

Carol LaHurd "Recite in the Name of Your Lord: Resources for Introducing Islam and the Qur’an to Christians" Summer In Dialog: A Journal of Theology. vol. 42, no. 2, 2002 : 170-172

In the face of ongoing ethnic and political conflicts worldwide, reading and discussion of scripture across religious boundaries is one strategy for defusing antagonisms. Drawing upon the author’s experience with both biblical interpretation and dialogue among Jews, Christians, and Muslims, this essay describes potential benefits and hazards of such interfaith reading and provides practical suggestions for initiating this form of dialogue encounter.