Category: Theology

BOOK CHAPTERS

Sharon Betcher "The Second Descent of the Spirit of Life from God: The Assumption of Jemima Wilkinson (Chapter 6)" In Apocalyptic Desire. eds. Lee Quimby and Brenda Brasher. Equinox Publishing 2006 : 72-85

Betcher considers how Jemima Wilkinson, the first American female utopian leader, having leaned into surrounding industrial socio-economic anxieties and into the energies of religious apocalypse, attempted to open out a communitarian economics and to create a social structure or ‘living room’ amenable to the dislocated by making ‘Spirit’ mean otherwise.

Sharon Betcher "Crip/tography: Of Karma and Cosmopolis" In Planetary Loves: Spivak, Postcoloniality and Theology. eds. Stephen Moore and Mayra Rivera. 2010

Betcher assumes Spivak‘s challenge towards archaeology of the invisible powerlines of ‗globalicities.‘ After opening out the gestural articulations of civility, Spivak‘s renovation of western anthropology is assumed as key to theological geographies hoping to counter urban grids of fear.

Sharon Betcher "Take My Yoga upon You (Matt 11:29): A Spirit/ual Pli/e for the Global City" In Polydoxy: Theologies of the Manifold. eds. Laurel Schneiders and Catherine Keller. Routledge 2010

Thinking with and through disability experience (as itself a yoke or harness for spiritual practice) and comparative theological conversation might occasion the redeployment of [S]pirit as a “yoga” or “yoke” (the words share the same Sanskrit root) of generosity so as to address the raw aches of our precarious existence to which the urban disposition of the planet now exposes us.

Sharon Betcher "Politics of Fear, Path of Faith" In Stand Boldly: Lutheranism for the 21st Century. ed. Eric Trozzo. Three Trees Press 2009

Modernity, environmental degradation and the pull of people towards larger cities disrupts the human psyche, developing an ‘attachment disorder,’ where trust becomes near impossible. Religions and faith, typically, have been devoted to the ‘safguard[ing of] trust.’ In this context, Luther‘s notion of sola fide is engaged as the author argues that faith is the practice that teaches us to ‘navigate through our fears.’

Sharon Betcher "Grounding the Spirit" In Eco-Spirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. eds. Laurel Kearns and Catherine Keller. Fordham University Press 2007

Betcher engages a psycho-theological history of Spirit, that concept by which Christianity has often escaped the tug of gravity. By opening out the aversions to ground that have been carried in theologies of spirit, Betcher hopes to release Spirit in and for ‗organic transcending.‘ When the Spirit gets grounded, we may then circulate our life love as groundswell rather than transcendental updraft.

Sharon Betcher "Monstrosities, Miracles, and Mission: Religion and the Politics of Disablement" In Postcolonial Theologies: Divinity and Empire. eds. Catherine Keller, Michael Nausner, and Mayra Rivera. Chalice 2004 : 79-99

Betcher considers the religious use of ‗disablement‘ and how the metaphor, when imbricated with Spirit, figures into modern, Western, Christian and cultural eschatology, social justice and ecclessiology, and even scientific and economic, practice.

Karen L. Bloomquist "Let God be God: The Theological Necessity of Depatriarchalizing God" In Our Naming of God. ed. Carl Braaten. Minneapolis: Fortress Press 1989
Karen L. Bloomquist "Sexual Violence: Patriarchy’s Offense and Defense" In Christianity, Patriarchy and Abuse: A Feminist Critique. eds. Joanne Carlson Brown and Carole Bohn. Pilgrim 1989
Karen L. Bloomquist "Traditioning, Truth-telling, Transforming" In Lutheran Women in Ordained Ministry, 1970-1995. ed. Gloria E. Bengston. Minneapolis: Augsburg 1995
Karen L. Bloomquist "The Ordained Woman: Embarrassment or Gift?" In Women and Religion: A Reader for the Clergy. ed. Regina Coll. New York: Paulist Press 1982